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Enjoy Chocolate?

Buy Fair Trade chocolate!

By purchasing Fair Trade CertifiedTM cocoa products, you are providing higher living wages to cocoa farmers, supporting the rights of women, and bypassing conventional systems of trade which exploit farmers.

Galebre:


This is the hometown of Dr. Brou, who has established a school for the children of cocoa farmers.



Dr. Brou. He is the main pastor of a large, evangelical Christian church in Abidjan. There are 13 other pastors.



Left, the building Dr. Brou has constructed in order to house the leather-working studio and the sewing room. The money for this building, $2500, came from a donations by Sweet Earth Organic Chocolates. Middle, Dr. Brou envisions a hotel on this lake, which is an old quarry filled in by water. The French dug the quarry years ago in order to make asphalt to pave roads in the region. Right, fabrics woven by the children of Kedesch, Dr. Brou's school that is financially supported in part by his church.



Left, a typical West African kitchen. The mud walls are covered in black soot from countless cooking fires. Behind a small wooden partition is the rice that is bundled together, dried in the sun, and then stored in a hot, dry spot. Middle, before plastic, water was obtained in pottery jugs like this one. They were very heavy. Right, palm fruits are processed outside the kitchen. The bundles of palm fruit are disassembled and the resulting fruits, which are bright orange and black, are boiled to soften the exterior. Oil rises to the top, and the kernels and fibrous material are separated from the liquid, which becomes the basis of many stews. Palm oil is rich in vitamin A.



Left, dried rice is pounded to loosen the chaff, which is then blown off when the grains are thrown in the air. Typically, rice is pounded for each meal. It is stored on the stalk. Middle, rice is laid out in the sun in these bundles to dry, then stored in a kitchen or smokehouse. Right, palm fruits are processed outside the kitchen. The bundles of palm fruit are disassembled and the resulting fruits, which are bright orange and black, are boiled to soften the exterior. Oil rises to the top, and the kernels and fibrous material are separated from the liquid, which becomes the basis of many stews. Palm oil is rich in vitamin A.


Left, sesame pods. Sesame is native to Africa. Middle, this vine was trained up onto the roof of this building to provide shade and protection from the rain. Right, a plantain grove. Plantains are roasted and served in pieces of newspaper. Or, they are steamed and served with a sauce. Or, they might be fried in palm oil to make red-red, a Ghanaian dish.



Left, "Friendship Hotel" located in Galebre. Middle-left, daughter of one of the staff holds up a PH&F flashlight. Middle-right, two members of the hotel staff. Right, the hotel restaurant.



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